How much space do we give between panels?

#2
Depends on the effect you're trying to achieve, but usually you want at least a little space between panels. Spacing between panels affects how the panels are read-- large gaps will make it feel like more time is happening in between the images, so it may be useful to put one there if you want a pause or for certain panels to have more weight. Cramped panels may have a faster, more frenzied feel.

I think a standard gap is like 1/8" or 2mm. If you're using a program like Clip Studio Paint you can set your default panel space and all the divisions will be that size.
 
#3
Depends on the effect you're trying to achieve, but usually you want at least a little space between panels. Spacing between panels affects how the panels are read-- large gaps will make it feel like more time is happening in between the images, so it may be useful to put one there if you want a pause or for certain panels to have more weight. Cramped panels may have a faster, more frenzied feel.

I think a standard gap is like 1/8" or 2mm. If you're using a program like Clip Studio Paint you can set your default panel space and all the divisions will be that size.
Thanks. That sound good.
 

Saxitlurg

4-Stripe White Belt
#7
I have never thought about it. I know they're all the same size because of the way I make them, but I have no idea what that size actually is. If I can still see the difference in all the panels when I zoom out really far, then it's a good size.
 

Saxitlurg

4-Stripe White Belt
#9
It's a tip I learned from a lighting designer when I was in animation class. Obviously he was talking about it in terms of lighting ("if you can still clearly see where the focus is supposed to be when you zoom out really far, then you're on the right track") But I've found zooming out and looking at your work is a useful technique for lots of things.
 
#10
Oh yeah, definitely! I was taught early on when doing traditional work to step at least 5-7 feet back and look at it, because that's the distance most people see art from in a gallery or whatever, and you get a much better perspective on things that way. For digital stuff, zooming out is a good equivalent.
 

Saxitlurg

4-Stripe White Belt
#11
Oh yeah, definitely! I was taught early on when doing traditional work to step at least 5-7 feet back and look at it, because that's the distance most people see art from in a gallery or whatever, and you get a much better perspective on things that way. For digital stuff, zooming out is a good equivalent.
Another good method is taking off your glasses if your sight-impaired, haha
 
#12
It's definitely good to set a rule of thumb and stick to it. For my online graphic novel, all of my panels are 30 pixels thick. I try not to do standard layouts and avoid a grid, but it can't always be achieved. Regardless, having some continuity so people can understand where a page ends is helpful. I'm a fan of https://www.ilpersona.com/ but sometimes their panels trick me up a bit.