The Superhero Webcomic Thread

Discussion in 'Comic Discussion' started by Shaneoid, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

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    Hi CBHers! Superheroes and comic books seem to go hand in hand, the perfect format to get those awesome potent and wacky adventures out there. Webcomics are no different, and I'm making this thread to discus the wonderful world of Superheroes on the web!

    While a lot of webcomics defy convention (and rightly so), Superheroes fit nicely in to their own neat category. From here I hope we can focus on that and help each other grow as a community, help support and promote each other and generally have fun!


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    Some questions to ponder, or maybe reply to. Submit or ask your own if you'd like!

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?
    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?
    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?
    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)
    ♦ Capes... Yes or no?

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    ♦ What Superhero webcomics are you reading right now? Which are you all time favourites?
    ♦ Have you ever done any fan art for Superhero OCs from Webcomics? We'd love to see it!
    ♦ What pulls you in to a Superhero webcomic? What things do you avoid?
    ♦ Where do you find these comics? Would you like there to be a better method of finding them?
    ♦ What kind of things would you like to see in Superhero webcomics, given the unrestrained format of them?

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    I thought we could have a community message board for anyone wishing to do projects to help each other. This will be updated as old projects end and new ones arise. If you have any ideas for community projects, please mail me here and I'll put it up here.

    First off, I want to create a banner for this forum topic featuring a few of the CBH community's very own OCs. I will do the artwork, so please mail me here if you'd like your character on the banner. I'll message out to the people I know who do Webcomic Superheroes, but I don't know everyone so please get in touch with permission to use your OCs.

    Other ideas we could bounce around.....

    History of Superhero webcomics - Compile a document tracing the past few decades of our chosen genre.
    Crossover events - Hey it's worked for the mainstream!
    Hero vs. Hero events - Prepare for a death battle?
    Video blogs? - Anyone on Youtube?

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    ♦ Adventures of Ms Rocket [The] - @DLF
    ♦ Blue Valkyrie [The] - @TheBlueValkyrie
    ♦ Don't Be A Hero - @Greg Dickson
    ♦ Freak of Nature - @ZTG
    ♦ Heroes of the World and Beyond - @Shaneoid
    ♦ Heroic Shenanigans - @NelmaThyria
    ♦ J-Man the Series - @Jonny Aleksey
    ♦ Majestic Knight - @Bencomicgraphics
    ♦ Neon Rabbit - @Wakaxo
    ♦ Night Twink - @Shaneoid
    ♦ Ray Thunder - @Shanny8
    StarHammer - @JNMonk
    ♦ Start Again - @JamieMe
    ♦ Wish - @Alexis Sergio
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2017
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  2. micahdraws

    micahdraws Blue Belt

    Gonna properly answer questions as soon as I finish sketching my Sparrow page! But I'd love to see the Sparrow included on the banner, so let me know what you need from me. I have a turnaround that I can email to you :)
     
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  3. JamieMe

    JamieMe Administrator Staff Member

    I'm going to give this is a shot as a comic creator (not a webcomic, but I want to join in, ha ha):

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?

    I wanted a challenge. All the notable superhero stories are about saving America lots of the time, and that can get boring. So I thought how cool would it be to tell a story set in my area, and create a Great Britain that had a publicly appointed superhero to look after it. A superhero boy meets girl story ensues... couldn't resist.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?

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    START AGAIN has influences from my roots, and hometown area. It features real locations too that you can recognise are clearly Leeds in the UK. The dialogue is super important to getting that authentic vibe, so I spent a lot of time fine-tuning the characters to have their local dialect, and quirks. It is a love letter to where I live for sure.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?

    Nudity is hilarious when it comes to promoting. Like, Kickstarter will promote projects that feature brutal violence, but a bit of nudity? They sh*t the bed. It is the same in most stuff, and I get why nudity can't be used in lots of circumstances, but it is hilarious that we live in a world that loses it sh*t over a pair of breasts, but people getting eaten by zombies? No worries.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)

    Be absolutely sure it is new and fresh, or it'll bomb. The category is overexposed, IMO, and you have to have something different just to have a slighter of a chance let alone popularity.

    Preview link: https://tapastic.com/series/startagain
     
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  4. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    Well you're the boss you can do what you want haha :D
     
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  5. JamieMe

    JamieMe Administrator Staff Member

    Lmao.
     
  6. micahdraws

    micahdraws Blue Belt

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?

    I had an uncle and a few friends who were really into comics. My first true foray into superheroes was the X-Men cartoon in the early 90s! Then my uncle gave me an X-Men trade paperback and a bunch of my friends got me involved in X-Men action figures. It took a while for me to really get into comics because I didn't have the money or the access. But once I did, I found it kind of addictive!

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?

    A lot of my inspiration comes from outside the superhero genre. Mythology, folklore, and some books like Fables and Saga. In superhero genre, I try to draw inspiration from the non-A-list comics. I don't like Marvel's weird fetish for events, and I try to read books that have a good ensemble cast because I want to learn how to make an ensemble group.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?

    So far none, but a lot of that is because my comic hasn't launched yet! My biggest challenge with creating the comic is figuring out how to make it more "true" to the source material while still adapting it for a superhero genre. There are a lot of really cool myths and legends out there and it's hard to figure out how to make it work.

    The other big challenge is which legends to actually use. There are so many great myths that I'm spoiled for choice!

    I think my particular approach to the superhero genre -- that is, basing the entire world on folklore/mythology -- is unique and will help me in marketing. Mythological figures exist in many superhero stories, but none of them focus exclusively on those stories. That's where the Sparrowverse stands apart.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)

    Read Marvel and DC and try to at least keep abreast of what they're doing even if you can't read the books every month. Like it or not, they are the big names in superhero stories, so it's important to know where they stand. The majority of superhero storytelling and sequential art conventions outside Marvel/DC are inspired by them (even if it's not conscious), so it's important to have that base to work from.

    That said, I'm not saying to follow their style blindly. It's important to be aware of their activities, but it's like how a music producer should be aware of music trends even outside their genre. If they're doing something you don't like, then by all means, don't use that. For example, I really hate all the time travel plots that Marvel and DC do, so I will never do any time travel stories in the Sparrow.

    ♦ What Superhero webcomics are you reading right now? Which are you all time favourites?

    Oh man, hmm. On the DC side, Super Sons and JLA: Rebirth are my main picks. Right now I'm waiting for Marvel's ResurrXion, but I'll try to pick up X-Men Gold, Iceman, and Secret Warriors

    ♦ Have you ever done any fan art for Superhero OCs from Webcomics? We'd love to see it!

    Not yet. I've been focusing on my own work. Once that's done, I'll be branching out, contacting other creators about doing fan art or guest pages, etc.

    ♦ What pulls you in to a Superhero webcomic? What things do you avoid?

    Character concepts pull me in first. I like superpowers. It's my favorite thing about the superhero genre. I like my superheroes to be, well, super! Theoretically, anyone could be Batman (yeah, I know, I'm exaggerating a bit) but nobody could be, say, Storm. I think that's cool. So I look for superhero comics that have cool powers. It doesn't have to be something new and revolutionary. I just like superpowers.

    Then I like good writing. Good art is nice, but I'll forgive a lot of art mistakes if the story is good. Not everything has to be all polished and clean visually to be a good story!

    ♦ Where do you find these comics? Would you like there to be a better method of finding them?

    I think it would be cool to have a collective or community for superhero webcomic creators to network. Every genre has certain unique challenges and issues and I feel like superheroes are no different. Even within the genre there are plenty of different directions to go and I think it would be really cool to have other superhero creators to bounce ideas off of. I like networking with comic creators in general but a group of superhero creators specifically would be badass.

    ♦ What kind of things would you like to see in Superhero webcomics, given the unrestrained format of them?

    Gosh, I am not sure. I'll try to come back to this question later. I've been too busy focusing on what I want out of my comic (and then making it) that I haven't thought about what I want in the genre overall.
     
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  7. DLF

    DLF Blue Belt

    I love the idea of doing a crossover event, or at least references. I am an absolute sucker for crossovers, cameos, all that jazz. I know that my comic is eventually going to bring up alternate universes and multiple versions of my heroine. I'd love it if there was an alternate world version of her in someone else's comic.

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?
    I really love the genre. Its a big old umbrella that let's me tell tons of different stories, science fiction, horror, fantasy, adventure, etc. At the core of every superhero story is really about characters and relationships.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?

    The world is retro-future because I wanted to draw from the Silver Age of superheroes and the optimism of the Space Race. My main heroine a blend of a bunch of female heroes I always liked. She has the optimism of Supergirl, the toughness and femininity of Sailor Jupiter, and the compassion and desire for more out of life of basically every Disney Princess.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?

    Promoting has been hard. Unless you're a "name" or working on a famous character no one really seems to care. I've actually had friends ask me if I'm doing this as a stepping stone to work at Marvel.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)

    Make the comics YOU want to make. Don't try to copy someone else. In superheroes especially a unique voice is really important to stand out. Find the stories only you and your characters can tell and do that. Don't try to make a Batman or Wolverine story fit around original characters.

    ♦ What Superhero webcomics are you reading right now? Which are you all time favourites?

    I'm a pretty big fan of Spinerette. It really hits that tongue-in-cheek sense of humor about superhero tropes while also being a pretty compelling story about these handful of characters.

    ♦ Have you ever done any fan art for Superhero OCs from Webcomics? We'd love to see it!
    I haven't. I probably should though...

    ♦ What pulls you in to a Superhero webcomic? What things do you avoid?
    Its really the characters. If I like the characters, either the visual design or the powers or just the personality, I'll want to know what happens. Who are they going to battle? What adventure are they going on? What happens when they're not in costume?
    The only thing I avoid is the really dark grim and gritty heroes. Nothing wrong with that. I enjoy a good "hard-R" story now and then but its just so done to death for me. If you're character never cracks a smile because they've been through too much hell I'll have a hard time getting into it.

    ♦ Where do you find these comics? Would you like there to be a better method of finding them?
    Mostly by word of mouth from other comics creators/fans. I really wish there was like a dedicated hosting space for superhero webcomics with categories like "Mystery," "Ensemble," or "Sci-Fi"

    ♦ What kind of things would you like to see in Superhero webcomics, given the unrestrained format of them?
    I'd like to see more people experiment with format. Webcomics don't have to be the same shape and size as comic pages. Let's go nuts. Maybe a splash page can be extra tall or extra wide. Through in an animated gif on a page and make the comic have some subtle visual effects. I also think it would be nice to link older stories and comics. Having the classic "Editor's Note - Check Issue #47" but actually link to that specific comic makes too much sense.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
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  8. Wakaxo

    Wakaxo 4-Stripe White Belt

    This is my kind of thread! :D
    I'll answer the reader question's later, but for now the creator questions;

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?
    I've liked superhero stories for as long as I can remember, I grow up watching the old Spider-Man cartoons, Static Shock, the 1990's X-men cartoons. etc etc etc.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?
    My characters personalities are inspired in part by my close friends, and in part by some of my fave fictional characters. As for the costumes (which are obviously one of the more important parts of a good superheros design ;P ), my main character's super-suit is heavily inspired by anime, which looking at my art style, it should be no surprise I'm an anime fan. :D I didn't want her costume to be a run-of-the-mill heroine costume, and I certainly did NOT want it to have any of the fashion trappings female superheroes get stuck with, such was boob windows or stilettos. I wanted to design a costume that would be practical, and relatively simple.

    The setting is modern day Canada, I wanted to keep the setting simple and familiar, so I picked one of my fave cities, Calgary. Also, there is a real lack of Canadian superheroes, so I figured why wait for more when I can make my own?

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?
    Well I'm a shy person by nature, and I have never worked in sales, so self-promotion was a whole new skill set for me to learn.

    Also depending on where your comic is, the reception can really vary. For example, superhero comics don't seem to do so well on Tapastic, its been an uphill struggle to get noticed among the gag-a-day comics. But Line Webtoons seems to have a good readership for superhero type comics.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)
    Push the boundaries, there is a lot of things that are lacking in the mainstream. If there is something you want to see that is constantly ignored, misrepresented, or just never done well, then instead of waiting for it, why not make your own?

    I'll have to watch for the community projects, they all sound very interesting! I especially like the sounds of the Crossover event and the Hero vs. Hero event!

    Also you can put Dakota (The Neon Rabbit) on the banner if you'd like! :D
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  9. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    There's some great points to pick up from here

    "Sparrowverse". Love it. :D

    I appreciate what you're saying, however in regards to time travel, I think you can still be original with it, I've certainly got a lot of ideas having studied quantum philosophy and watched Doctor Who since I was a babe heh. Part of why I decided to jump in to my own comic was because of the repetitiveness of the Marvel/DC tropes. They have to 'reset' their players after events so they're not unrecognisable, because merchandising dictates it. We're not so restrained with webcomics.

    That's an interesting perspective. I love superpowers too, for one thing, they're fun to draw! However I take an alternate angle with my comic, the type of powers you speak of are rare in my universe, most heroes are specially trained or tech-based. A city of Batmen haha.

    This, basically. You're tapping in to a genre with unlimited potential. I tried to create stories for other genres, but I found myself in a creative slump. Superheroes let's you create something from street level thuggery to epic space opera at the turn of a page.

    I hear ya! I think working for a big company would not be all it's cracked up to be. Part of the fun of doing webcomics is that you work to your own pace and leisure. It would be different for a company I'd expect, but then I'd hate working under pressure for comics, it would suck the fun out of it. I hope we can get some promotion your way bud.

    I agree with keeping it simple, not only from a 'you have to draw this costume a lot' perspective, but over-complicated costumes can look a bit 'busy' to me (think The Darkness). However I'm not opposed to characters being more flirty with their costumes, but I'm for sexual expression rather than repression, maybe it's a European thing lol

    This is one of the problems I found when starting out uploading to comic host sites. Webtoon was the only one which even had a Superhero category! Tapastic is a whole 'nother forum post in itself haha.

    Well thanks for the input. I think community events could draw more people in to our respective comic universes. While the mainstream have decades of lore to pull on, we have precious little but the odd attempt at advertising, let's change that! We have the ideal format, as opposed to other webcomic genres, to mix it up and get people interested in our respective works.

    The character battle idea is doing it's rounds about the internet right now, I don't think we should be apologetic in getting our characters involved in this. Expanding on your comic in such ways would be another avenue for readers to invest in them. I knocked up this sketch as a rough idea of how it may look, (using Neon Rabbit, hope you don't mind @Wakaxo ) Let me know your thoughts.

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  10. TheBlueValkyrie

    TheBlueValkyrie White Belt

    Hi everyone! I'm Emily, and I'm the writer for The Blue Valkyrie, a queer and trans superhero comic. It can be read on tumblr: http://bluevalkyriecomic.tumblr.com/ and on tapastic: https://tapastic.com/series/thebluevalkyrie

    Since i have the most experience writing superhero stuff, this is really my wheelhouse!

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    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?

    I loved superheroes ever since i was a kid. I had a "collection" (read: about 10 comics) of spider-man when i was growing up, and i even drew my own (crappy) superhero comics. When i got back into reading DC and Marvel comics as an adult, i found that there were very few queer superheroes, and trans women were limited to fridging and supporting roles as best. So when i started writing The Blue Valkyrie, my goal was to do something different, but since then, the story has gotten far away from its roots.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?
    Obviously, with Chloe, i've drawn a lot from my own life, feelings and experiences. The nice thing about writing a character that is sorta like you is you can think "what would I do in this situation?" to get your answer on how a character would react. When it comes to the world/setting, i wanted my superheroes and my world to be a little more down to earth. A lot of superhero comics are about, for example, batman beating up drug dealers. Superheroes seem to punch first and ask questions later. Superheroes fight villains and problems that can be brute-forced. I wanted something a little different. The problems the titular Blue Valkyrie faces include gentrification, people being pushed out of their homes. There's punching and action, sure, but the issues underscoring the action are more complex than a space alien that wants to enslave humanity (at least for now). So i took a lot of inspiration from current events for this. Cream City is an amalgom of the two places i've spent the most time living: Milwaukee and Chicago.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?
    I think it's always a struggle for newer creators to gain a readership, especially in webcomics. How do i get people to choose my webcomic over anyone elses, among the thousands? But on the plus side, while superheroes are the primary genre for DC and Marvel and many other major publishers, that's certainly not the case with webcomics. But to get people who don't read superhero comics to START reading superhero comics is difficult. There is a bit of a stigma with superheroes even among comic readers (how many on twitter will swear up and down that they don't read cape books?).

    What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)
    When you choose the superhero genre, you're competing with the biggest names in comics for attention. You also have to be ready for people to compare your comic to other superhero comics incessently. You get used to it.


    edit: holy moley i didn't mean for those images to be so big.
     
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  11. Shanny8

    Shanny8 Blue Belt

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?

    Ever since I could draw & read, I've been drawing and reading mainly superhero comic books. Though I do read other material now as well, I still like to draw superheroes.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?


    A lot of my inspiration comes from the weirdest places. One of my first self pubbed comics, The Clique, came about coz I was in this phase where I got tired of drawing superheroes in costumes. I wanted to do something different...the world settings are pretty much the basic settings to our everyday world except that there is an awareness that these superheroes exist.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?


    There are periods and times where I find it really exhausting to create coz it feels like there is this perception out there where it feels like a lot of people hate on superhero comics- so even if I am trying to make my story a little different than what Ive seen out there, it still gets bias and lumped in "oh, you're drawing superheroes" and doesnt get fair treatment or the time of the day that other comics might get. That being said, I still do my comic and try to grind it out...

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)

    Try to create something different & unique. Yeah influences are good, but even as a superhero comic artist, I myself get tired of seeing diff artists do their version of Spawn, Batman, Superman, Goku(so powerful it aint even funny). Dont be afraid to give your characters vulnerabilities & mortality; not all characters gotta be "world beaters".

    ♦ What Superhero webcomics are you reading right now? Which are you all time favourites?


    As regular comics go- so far with DC, I've been reading Green Arrow & Harley Quinn. With Marvel I've been reading Black Panther, Black Widow, Miles Spider-Man, and [Hydra] Cap'n America. As webcomics, I've been reading Dont be a Hero, HOTWAB, Night Twink, & Neon Rabbit

    ♦ Have you ever done any fan art for Superhero OCs from Webcomics? We'd love to see it!


    Only fan art I did was for Dont Be a Hero. Posted it in another thread...I want to do more, but right now between drawing my own comics & my day job, things are pretty busy.

    ♦ What pulls you in to a Superhero webcomic? What things do you avoid?


    Something unique- it doesnt seem like the garden variety 'superhero' story. Unique characters with a touch of humanity to them...awesomely developed fight scenes. Elaborate story plotting and structure.

    Things I avoid- bad story and cookie cutter type characterization.

    ♦ Where do you find these comics? Would you like there to be a better method of finding them?


    I'd like to be able to find them better, but I know some creators(myself included) cant always have an online presence 24/7. I have my webcomic on major sites like Tapastic & Webtoons, but I'm trying to put together my own site eventually.

    ♦ What kind of things would you like to see in Superhero webcomics, given the unrestrained format of them?


    I would like to see a superhero story where this particular individual struggles with morals & ethics. He or she is not a villain, but hey- they're poor, and they need _______. Are they gonna skim off the cash register at their shitty PT job? Rob a bank or armored vehicle? Hit up a drug house and take the profit money? Double down & try to get yet another job? Something that makes them think, and struggle with using their abilities to make their life a little easier, but know that they want to be that consummate icon that their loved ones or the public in general can look up to as a symbol of that all is not bad.
     
  12. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    Hi Emily, thanks for the post, your comic book world sounds wonderful! I also saw a lack of gay superheroes that weren't just stereotypes, I tried to bring that realness to my own, something that wasn't all romance or camp, there's another side to gay life I wanted to represent. LGBT characters appear to be popular at the moment, how do you feel about that?

    I have felt this, I thought I was imagining it. I wondered if there was almost an institutional bias against them, given that only Webtoon seems to promote them on the comic host sites.

    Mirroring Emily's sentiment here. Perhaps we could all draw on our experiences of this in a further post on this thread.

    Can I get an amen! This is so true. After watching another film about Superman and Kryptonite I nearly lost it. You make a 'world beater' and you starve yourself of storytelling potential (IMO). I'd prefer to write for someone finding strength to overcome an obstacle, than having such unlimited strength in the first place.
     
  13. NelmaThyria

    NelmaThyria 4-Stripe White Belt

    Hey there! I'm Haley and I'm working on Heroic Shenanigans, which is about the adventures of the superpowered teens who attend Camp Kapow, summer camp for superheroes.

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?
    I've never really read any of the big-name Marvel/DC comics, so I can't say that I got my inspiration from traditional superhero comics. I have always been interested in stories that involved people with supernatural abilities though, whether these abilities are superpowers, magic, or something else. I love how creative you can get with what sorts of powers your characters have, or even with putting a twist on a commonly used power.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?
    The things that really had an impact on my formation of my story and characters as a teen were Avatar the Last Airbender, and book series like Harry Potter and Percy Jackson. (as my comic does take place at a camp and I have to say that I came up with that before I knew anything about Percy jackson, haha) I've always had a soft spot for character-driven stories about kids with powers saving the world, so I knew that was the kind of story I wanted to tell. @Shanny8 touched on something I agree with as well, about how characters with flaws and weaknesses are so much more compelling than "perfect", indestructible heroes.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?
    I want my comic to stand out as unique, as any comic artist would, but I also want to play off of common superhero tropes. I have to be careful not to overdo it, and to keep from falling into too many cliches, but I also don't want my comic to just devolve into a parody of existing superhero stories. As for promoting my comic, I don't think I've run into any problems that are specific to it being a superhero story. Promotion is just hard in general, as we all know! Although like @Wakaxo said, webtoons does have a superhero genre, which has helped make my comic more visible there than it is on tapastic.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)
    Don't feel like you have have to do what other superhero comics are doing. Especially with webcomics, you have the freedom to make your comic completely your own, and even mix genres! Just because your comic might revolve around costumed characters fighting crime, it doesn't mean that you have to follow every superhero comic convention. It's good to be aware of tropes so that you can use and/or avoid them effectively, but you don't have to use them exclusively.

    This thread is great and I'm really excited to see what comes out of it! I'm looking forward to checking out all of your comics, too.
     
  14. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    OMG Nelma, that synopses sounds amazing! Can I make a suggestion? If you're making any promotion material for your comic, I'd make sure people know the summer camp angle on your comic because it may not be initially apparent, and it is a great selling point.

    Again, this gives you something unique to bring to the Superhero table.

    Thanks I hope you all feel you can get involved! :)
     
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  15. NelmaThyria

    NelmaThyria 4-Stripe White Belt

    That is a great suggestion! The summer camp aspect was part of my pitch at the one con I've been to so far, but I could definitely include that more in any future promo material as it probably isn't obvious at first glance, and is something that can really set my comic apart. Thanks!
     
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  16. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    Aye, I think I've seen your logo when voting over on the bonus incentives on Topwebcomics. I mean, everything looks good but I'd not make the summer camp connection and that is an angle you should be selling.

    As for everyone's ideas about a collective, there is a Superhero webcomic collective called Collective of Heroes. It's a small group which helps promote it's comics, and we occasionally do the odd art trade. However, it's very picky as to what comics they'd let in, mostly down to the level of art I believe. Also it hasn't been incredibly active as I assume it had been (I'm just new to it). Now I would be interested in getting something up and running that wasn't so exclusive, but my HTML is very basic.

    I was thinking maybe we could do a kind of PDF 'fanzine' which I would be more than happy to compile. In it we could do previews, interviews and the like and get it about the internet and really promote the Superhero Webcomic scene? Let me know your thoughts guys :cool:
     
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  17. Greg Dickson

    Greg Dickson White Belt

    Hey peeps, I'm Greg Dickson, creator of the superhero-slaying webcomic, Don't Be A Hero.

    ♦ What brought you in to the Superhero genre?

    It was kind of coincidental, honestly. I've never been heavy into the superhero genre. I've watched some superhero movies, but have never collected any comics about mainstream superheroes. I've been more of a fan of action-based manga. But in a way, that genre is kind of like the superhero one, since many stories like Fullmetal Alchemist, Gurren Lagann, One Piece, Naruto, etc, have heroes with larger-than-life powers/abilities on hand. When creating my comic, I was inspired by Big Hero 6 when it was released. I loved the combination of technology and superheroes, and ideas for a story of my own started solidifying in my head, and Don't Be A Hero took shape.

    ♦ What are the inspirations for your characters and world settling?

    As I said, Big Hero 6 was a major source of inspiration for my science/superhero theme but some other franchises inspired me in different ways. The quirky theme of Scott Pilgrim was a source of inspiration for taking down a number of weird villains in my story, and Mega Man was an inspiration for the whole "collect-athon of superpowers theme", that my main character has (although I don't want to fully rely on a simple formula like that. I don't want a 'monster-of-the-week' formula. I want each opponent to express their own unique character types and backstories, instead of being just a hollow challenge to overcome). As for the world setting, it wasn't inspired by anything, really. I wanted the story to take place in a city, protected by a massive group of superheroes that were pretty poor at doing their jobs (done so poorly, that they stirred up the main conflict with my protagonist as a result). There are elements of my city that draw inspiration from other sources (like my university setting in the beginning is inspired by State U from a show I love, called Undergrads). Really, I'm kind of building my city's locales as I go. I didn't have a detailed layout of my city beyond a basic structure. I'm winging it, at the moment.

    Character-wise, my main character Gemini doesn't really take inspiration from anyone, but a lot of my side characters have plenty of pop-culture references, from angry video game players, to a legendary badass roundhouse kicker who rules the world with his memes, to a certain disliked rapper who has an ego that shoots past the moon and out of our universe entirely. Quite a few of my characters are inspired from content I love, but with their own spins on them to make them their own unique persons.

    ♦ What are some challenges you've found creating and promoting your Superhero comic online?

    Keeping up with weekly updates. I have been able to keep up with them, but it is a lot of work to get detailed pages out on schedule every week. The hardest thing is that due to my lifestyle, I can only produce one page a week. I would love to be able to get 2 or 3 out a week, but it's just not physically possible for me, and I refuse to cut down on the quality of my art, just to get more pages out. This in turn, makes it a bit hard to promote, since I can only get one major piece of content out per week. I can't keep promoting tons of new updates throughout the week, so compared to those comics with frequent updates, I kind of get washed out.

    Also, the Action/Superhero genres are really hard to break into on webcomic sites, since they don't get as much traffic as others. I've actually switched my genre listing to Fantasy lately, just to open up to a larger audience, as my traffic had come to a standstill. I think there are some fantasy elements in my comic as well, but it is mainly an action/superhero story.

    ♦ What advice would you give anyone thinking of starting out in Superhero webcomics? (besides the usual)

    Focus plenty on your characters and story. Don't just throw a ton of fighting out the window and expect people to care. Once readers care about your characters, THEN they will care about what they're fighting for.

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    [​IMG]

    Feel free to include Gemini (Don't Be A Hero) in the banner (it's the pink-haired woman, by the way), and those community projects sound pretty fun, like the Hero vs. Hero idea.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
  18. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    Thanks for posting Greg! I love Big Hero 6! I can tell why you were so inspired by it.

    I wonder if you'd ever consider taking a quick hiatus so that you can create yourself a little buffer to take some of the pressure off?

    This is what we need to change! With enough of a gust behind us, we can try and put some wind in the sails of Superhero Webcomics.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
    Greg Dickson likes this.
  19. Shaneoid

    Shaneoid Purple Belt

    Hi guys I put together a mock up for a PDF mag idea I had. I thought it would be good to see something visual instead of just theorising about it, but obviously nothing is cemented here. Let's throw some ideas about!

    [​IMG]
     
    Wakaxo, ZTG, DLF and 2 others like this.
  20. Greg Dickson

    Greg Dickson White Belt

    Unfortunately, a quick hiatus won't really help me. I've taken a few weeks during Christmas break, and even a two week break in February between my chapters, and I still only have a one page buffer. My first break, I just wanted to mostly experiment with individual art pieces (I was so burned out on comic pages) as well as having more time to visit some family who travelled overseas, and the second break I used to fine-tune my story more, as well as having a little time to relax. Every time I get a buffer of a few pages, I start to burn out and need some time to unwind, which just lessens my buffer again. It's a never-ending spiral that sends me right back to where I started. I don't want to take a massive hiatus, or I may lose traction. However, I've always told myself that if I desperately need to take some time away from it, I will take one. I'm just not there yet. I'm not sure when, or if I'll ever need one. I guess time will tell, right?

    By the way, I like your little magazine cover mock-up. I bet given enough time, and with enough input from other creators, you could make a whole magazine for superhero webcomics.
     

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