#ComicBookHour Q&A Episode 4 "CREATOR INTERVIEW" (2018)

JamieMe

Administrator
Staff member
#1
Here are the questions from week 4. Enjoy!




Q1: I'd like to think every creator has a unique story of why they decided to start creating comics. What's yours?

Q2: I've always felt that creators starting out should strongly consider getting experience by creating short comics. What advice would you give to people potentially starting out in comics?

Q3: You've started making comics. What was the first hurdle you faced, and how did you get passed it?

Q4: Social media presence is a huge part of the comic creator "game". How have you found promoting yourself online?

Q5: Regardless of creating comics I'm a huge fan. I read all types, daily. In a single tweet tell me why yours should be my next one?

Get your CBH rank up by answering questions from previous weeks:

EPISODE #3 LINK
EPISODE #2 LINK
EPISODE #1 LINK
 
#2
Q1: The only question I was able to answer on the twitter version - it was Jim Lee's X-Men run and vivd memories of that number 1 issue in particular.

Q2: This is the approach that I've started using. In the past I've self-published a 24 page comic that was intended to be an ongoing series, the thing is, that can be a very daunting task if you're just starting out. It took me a good chunk of time to complete that issue and then when it was done I was excited but at the same time it was kinda like - time to do it all over again.

I think starting with short comics allows you to grow and learn as a creator with easily attainable goals. Pieces of work that aren't dependent on having to follow up with more issues can also help you build up your body of work in a quicker amount of time. Lastly, I think doing a bunch of short comics with different genres can give you ammunition when showing your portfolio to show that you are capable of drawing across a wide spectrum of subjects.

Q3: I didn't go to school for comics or art, so I was very surprised to find that - Hey! You have to actually know how to tell a story sequentially! What a novel idea! It would also really help to know perspective and anatomy while you're at it. You know, the fundamentals of comics... So because of this I like to say I had the best teachers. Will Eisner, Scott McCloud, George Bridgeman, Andy Schmidt and Klaus Jensen all helped me become the comic creator I am today because of their amazing books on how to make your way in this craft. I bought any book I could and created a curriculum for myself, complete with homework. I remember reading a quote from David Finch that said (paraphrasing) "to learn anatomy, draw every page of Bridgeman's Guide to Anatomy, then when you're finished go back to the beginning and do it again."

Q4: Slow going so far, though I think this will be helped along by starting to have tables at conventions and participating in communities such as Comic Book Hour to build a friends group and a following. At this point I am trying to establish relationships on Twitter and provide positive comments to creators I look up to and fellow creators in the community. I would like to be known as someone who brings along with them positivity and looking for the bright spots in the industry. There is so much negativity surrounding every aspect of life that I want my contribution online to be a positive one. I want Twitter to be my comic safe haven (as impossible as that sounds).

Q5: Currently my personal project isn't in existence yet BUT what I am working on currently is a submission for the OCTRTA anthology so why wouldn't you read? Also my storytelling :p
 

AnitaComics

4-Stripe White Belt
#3
Q1: I'd like to think every creator has a unique story of why they decided to start creating comics. What's yours?

It started because I was obsessed with how some manga artists drew bodies, hands, expressions, everything. I wanted to be just as expressive as them. It changed during the years, and now it's mostly related to the lot of stories I have to tell that I don't feel like saying out loud.

Q2: I've always felt that creators starting out should strongly consider getting experience by creating short comics. What advice would you give to people potentially starting out in comics?

Absolutely try yourself in shorter stories before diving into the long one. It gives you a measure of what you're able to do, and what you're still not able to do. Gives you an insight of the time you need to complete something. And it leaves you something you can share!
Also, try and find a team to work with. It's going to stress the hell out of you, but you're going to build something.
Last but not least, if you're just starting out, it's the time to do stuff you want to do and never think about the money. It'll come later, as will responsibilities and deadlines, and you'll regret not doing YOUR stuff before.

Q3: You've started making comics. What was the first hurdle you faced, and how did you get passed it?

Backgrounds. And perspective. They are still to this day my biggest nightmare, art-wise.
On a more personal ground, the hardest thing is not to be ashamed of what you were drawing one or two years ago. I've improved so much, but still my first experiences are out there and it gives me shivers, but I'm focusing on what I can do better instead of running away.

Q4: Social media presence is a huge part of the comic creator "game". How have you found promoting yourself online?

I love it. I'm growing slowly but steadily, and it's a huge comfort to know there's people out there appreciating my stuff, even if they're not many.
It took a while to find the right balance and the right platforms though!

Q5: Regardless of creating comics I'm a huge fan. I read all types, daily. In a single tweet tell me why yours should be my next one?

Do you like laughing? Do you like getting stabbed in the heart by feels mid laugh? Then DAWN OF THE DAD is for you.
 

Tait

4-Stripe White Belt
#4
Q1: I'd like to think every creator has a unique story of why they decided to start creating comics. What's yours?

This is a difficult one for me to answer. I’ve tried to express myself through drawing since a young age. Maybe it was because I’ve been reading comic books since I was about 4 years old. I definitely didn’t decide making comics was something I would do until much later in life though.

I guess why I’m doing it is because expressing myself visually has always been a little more comfortable for me than just words and it’s the only way I can figure to share the ideas that I have bouncing around in my head.

It’s also a way of taking the things I’ve always loved in my life, mixing them together, putting my own spin on it, then putting it back out there to say “This is what I like and this is what I think about it”.


Q2: I've always felt that creators starting out should strongly consider getting experience by creating short comics. What advice would you give to people potentially starting out in comics?

Just do it. Even if you think your ideas are horrible and don’t measure up to what’s out there, just do it. If you wait until you’re “good enough” you’ll miss a lot of chances. Also, “good enough” is subjective. You may see all the flaws in your work, but someone else may be more forgiving and still appreciate the view you’re offering.

Q3: You've started making comics. What was the first hurdle you faced, and how did you get past it?

Self-confidence and distractions. They kind of went hand in hand for me because I would tell myself “This idea isn’t good enough yet. I can’t start on it, so I’ll just do ‘X’ while I think about it.” However, I would often end up so engrossed in the other activity that I wouldn’t make much progress with my ideas.

I still struggle with this some, but the main thing is that I realize how much time I’ve wasted through indecision and so I’m just putting things out as my way of working on and improving them.

I am also finding inspiration and encouragement through the various online communities. That sometimes helps with distractions because it reminds me when I am neglecting my own work.

Q4: Social media presence is a huge part of the comic creator "game". How have you found promoting yourself online?

Difficult. I’m a quiet and private person by nature, so forcing myself to get out there and engage can be challenging. Communities like this are making it a little easier, but I’m still not completely sure where or how to invest my time for the best impact.

Q5:Regardless of creating comics I'm a huge fan. I read all types, daily. In a single tweet tell me why yours should be my next one?

Boiling my comic down to a single tweet is rough, but here is my ultimate goal for Pacifica:

Start with Grim’s Fairy Tales, change setting to fantasy world based on Pacific Northwest coastline, tweak timeline to approx. mid-1800s (think mountain men, wild west trick shooters), sprinkle in conspiracy theory and cryptozoology favs like Men in Black, Sasquatch, aliens, etc.

If that doesn’t sound like a fun read then I don’t know what is. :)
It is, of course, a work in progress.